Community problems & solutions

Program Development: Tip Sheet: 10 Tips for Safe Routes to School Programs and Liability

 

This tip sheet offers guidance for liability issues with walking or bicycling to school.

Authoring Organization: 
SRTS

Program Development: Involving Children with Disabilities in SRTS

Authoring Organization: 
National Center for Safe Routes to School

Guides: Safe Routes to School: Practice and Promise

Safe Routes to School: Practice and Promise describes what local SRTS programs are, why they are needed, how to measure success, and from whom others can learn. The publication is designed to provide enough information about SRTS programs so those in decision-making positions will be able to determine how to allocate scarce resources and to assure positive outcomes from SRTS efforts. It delves into the history of SRTS, considers risks and benefits, offers examples, and lists supportive agencies and organizations.

Authoring Organization: 
NHTSA

Toolkits: NHTSA Safe Routes to School Toolkit

NHTSA teamed up with the Marin County Bicycle Coalition's Safe Routes to School project to produce an 88-page toolkit for use by educators and others to promote walking and biking to school that includes sections on mapping the routes to school, activities and outreach, and classroom lessons. The toolkit also includes sample Safe Routes to School forms, press releases, posters, and other resources.

Authoring Organization: 
NHTSA

Garfield, New Jersey: Residents Benefit from a Healthy Living Campaign

The Garfield Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program targets two neighborhood schools, Woodrow Wilson #5 and Roosevelt #7.

Introduction

New Jersey: New Jersey SRTS Program

The New Jersey Department of Transportation’s (NJDOT) Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program is the culmination of a series of planning and developmental activities resulting in a  program to assist New Jersey communities.

Introduction

The New Jersey Department of Transportation’s (NJDOT) Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program is the culmination of a series of planning and developmental activities resulting in a comprehensive program to assist New Jersey communities in developing and implementing projects that encourage safe walking and bicycling to school. This series of planning and development occurred in three stages with major accomplishments along the way.

Concord, New Hampshire: Rundlett Middle School & Conant Elementary School benefit from joint SRTS program

A joint Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program was necessary because the schools are in a suburban area where nearby residents can walk to school.

Introduction

Rundlett Middle School and Conant Elementary School are one-quarter mile from each other in Concord, NH. A joint Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program was necessary because the schools are in a suburban area where nearby residents can walk to school. Rundlett is the only middle school in the district, and as a result, many of its 1,700 students have to ride the bus because they live too far to walk or bicycle.

Farmington, New Hampshire: Farmington SRTS Program

Law enforcement officers and school personnel worked together to design a Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program that addressed the concerns of the parents.

Introduction

McCook, Nebraska: Community Partners Boost SRTS

Partnerships throughout the community enabled McCook Elementary School to develop a Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program.

Introduction

Partnerships throughout the community enabled McCook Elementary School to develop a Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program that led to a 15 percent increase in students who walk or bicycle to school. Cooperation also provided students with a comprehensive message of nutrition, health and exercise that can be sustained over time.