Community problems & solutions

Brevard, North Carolina: A walking path for everyone

Brevard Elementary School students and recreational walkers in the 7,000-person community in Brevard, NC, will benefit from the Gallimore Road multi-use path.

Introduction

Brevard Elementary School students and recreational walkers in the 7,000-person community in Brevard, NC, will benefit from the Gallimore Road multi-use path to be constructed with a $250,000 Safe Routes to School (SRTS) infrastructure grant awarded in 2008 to the city from the North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT).

Asheville, North Carolina: Encouraging "Walking and Wheeling" School-Wide

Thanks to the efforts of one energetic parent, Ira B. Jones Elementary School in Asheville, N.C., has been participating in International Walk to School Day for a number of years.

Introduction

Thanks to the efforts of one energetic parent, Ira B. Jones Elementary School in Asheville, N.C., has been participating in International Walk to School Day for a number of years. Since the event’s inception in 2004, the event has evolved from a yearly event to a biannual event and then to a monthly “Walking and Wheeling” or “Strive Not to Drive” event.

Missoula, Montana: Students Participate in Weekly Walking School Buses

In summer 2006, the Bicycle Pedestrian Advisory Board of Missoula, Mont., engaged school and community organizations in the creation of a city-wide Safe Routes to School (SRTS) steering group.

Introduction

In summer 2006, the Bicycle Pedestrian Advisory Board of Missoula, Mont., engaged school and community organizations in the creation of a city-wide Safe Routes to School (SRTS) steering group with the goal of increasing the number of students that walked or bicycled to school and the awareness of the benefits of walking and bicycling to school.

Flathead County, Montana: Building Community Support for SRTS

MDOT agreed to fund a SRTS study identifying education, encouragement, enforcement and engineering projects that would increase the safety of students walking and bicycling to school.

Introduction

Evergreen Elementary School and Evergreen Middle School are in Flathead County, MT. The elementary school is on a busy, five-lane roadway at the county’s urban and rural interface. Currently, almost 25 percent of students walk to the two schools, even though there are no sidewalks on East Evergreen Drive, the street in front of the schools.

Bozeman, Montana: Walk to School Month Supported by City and Community

The Montana Nutrition and Physical Activity Program at Montana State University in Bozeman, in collaboration with the local Safe Routes to School (SRTS) Task Force, initiated a SRTS pilot program at the Emily Dickinson Elementary School.

Introduction

The Montana Nutrition and Physical Activity Program (MT NAPA) at Montana State University in Bozeman, in collaboration with the local Safe Routes to School (SRTS) Task Force, initiated a SRTS pilot program at the Emily Dickinson Elementary School in the hopes that the school’s success would lead to the implementation of SRTS activities at all of the six elementary schools in the city.

Billings, Montana: "Go Play" in Billings, Montana

In September 2008, Billings received bronze level status as a bicycle-friendly city from the American League of Bicyclists, thanks to its “Go Play” community awareness campaign.

Introduction

“Go Play” has new meaning in Billings, Montana. In 2004, the city with a population of 100,000 and with 23 elementary schools had been designated the least safe city for pedestrians in Montana by the Mean Streets Surface Transportation Policy Project.

Starkville, Mississippi: Education and Asphalt Move SRTS Program Forward

Starkville in Motion (SIM), a volunteer organization formed in 2005, is dedicated to increasing the number of bicycle and pedestrian paths in Starkville.

Introduction

Petal, Mississippi: Bike Lanes and Sidewalk Connect Students to Places

In summer 2007, Mississippi’s Department of Transportation announced that Petal would receive $213,028 in federal Safe Routes to School funds.

Introduction

Amory, Mississippi: A five-year plan makes SRTS progress in Amory

Following a five-year plan has helped the city of Amory and its school district take steps to make neighborhoods safer for children to walk and bicycle to school.

Introduction

Following a five-year plan has helped the city of Amory and its school district take steps to make neighborhoods safer for children to walk and bicycle to school. Amory, a small, rural community, has a population of 7,500, and its two elementary schools and middle school are all within a two-mile range of each other. Families feel safe in Amory.

 “Kids get on their bikes and ride all across town,” says Carol Rogers, Coordinator for School Health and grant writer for the school district.

Liberty, Missouri: Community to Provide Education and Infrastructure

In summer 2007, the city of Liberty received $240,000 in Safe Routes to School funds through the Missouri Department of Transportation.

Introduction

Liberty, MO, is a small historic community with a population of less than 30,000 people. All nine of the elementary schools in Liberty are in neighborhoods where most of the students live within walking distance to school. Unfortunately, a lack of infrastructure discourages many parents from allowing their children to walk or bicycle to school.