Engineering

New Resource: Ped-Bike Infrastructure Cost Estimator

Costs for pedestrian and bicycle safety infrastructure often vary greatly from city to city and state to state, but in general are low-cost compared to the costs of building new roadways.

SRTS National Conference Sets Record, Makes Presentations Available Online

What do a walking street sign, a rolling beetle, 650 Safe Routes to School practitioners, and 135 PowerPoint presentations have in common? The Safe Routes to School National Conference!

A word cloud generated from session titles of the 4th SRTS National Conference, held August 13-15, 2013, in Sacramento, Calif.

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Safe Routes to School Briefing Sheets by the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE)

The National Center for Safe Routes to School and the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) have created a series of nine instructional briefing sheets for transportation practitioners to use for Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program planning and implementation. The briefing sheets will support transportation engineers and planners as they work to establish safer walking and bicycling routes near schools.

The series includes the following topics:

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Chagrin Falls, Ohio: Comprehensive Safe Routes to School Program built around village cooperation and core goals of safety and encouragement

Safe Routes Chagrin is a truly cooperative endeavor which has improved safety and encouraged more students to walk and bike while building a sustainable program supported by the entire community.

Introduction

Chagrin Falls is a village of about 4,000 residents located 17 miles southeast of Cleveland.  The village school system includes an elementary school (grades K-3), an intermediate school (grades 4-6, school population about 480), a middle school (grades 7-8, school population about 320), and a high school.

Joke contest hatches award winning Safe Routes to School program

[Editor’s note: This article is longer than the normal Safe Routes Matters article, but with good reason: it is chock-full of great ideas for Safe Routes to School programs.  We have included links to key ideas to make navigating easier.]
 
Key Ideas
Evaluation and planning  ||  Improving infrastructure
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Safe Routes to School as a Catalyst for Community Change in Montpelier, Vermont

Six years ago, Community Connections, a local nonprofit that runs afterschool programs in Montpelier, Vt., public schools, identified a need to get students more physically active during the school day.  The organization saw the Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program as the perfect way to get students excited about physical activity.

After receiving a non-infrastructure SRTS grant from the state, Community Connections spent the next two years running programs that concentrated on the five E’s: Education, Encouragement, Enforcement, Evaluation and Engineering.

Case Study: Bellingham, WA

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Walk to School Day builds support for Safe Routes to School in Kauai

Sometimes, one day can turn into something much bigger.

In Kauai, Hawaii, a Walk to School Day event at Kapa’a Elementary School boosted community support for a full-fledged Safe Routes to School program. The community was concerned about traffic as well as childhood and adolescent obesity. In 2009-2010, the school was selected to serve as a pilot school for a Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program.

Safety-based Prioritization of Schools for Safe Routes to School Infrastructure Projects: A Process for Transportation Professionals

The National Center has prepared a new resource, “Safety-based Prioritization of Schools for Safe Routes to School Infrastructure Projects: A Process for Transportation Professionals” that describes a straightforward way to identify the schools and specific locations that have the greatest need for pedestrian infrastructure improvements .