Program organization

Getting Results: SRTS Programs That Increase Walking and Bicycling to School

Getting Results: SRTS Programs That Increase Walking and Bicycling to School offers brief summaries of eight programs that measured their walking and bicycling numbers and found an increase.  The resource aims to assist and inspire Safe Routes to School (SRTS) programs to measure student travel patterns to look for possible changes over time and measure the progress of their activities.

Put the data to work.

Ultimately, the collection of school travel data and subsequent analysis can enable a SRTS program to measure the efficacy of its programs, determine how successful it is and communicate its success to the community and potential funders.

Getting Results: SRTS Programs That Increase Walking and Bicycling to School is the third installment in a series of resources on getting and measuring results with SRTS programs. To read more about measuring and evaluating the results of an SRTS program, visit Getting Results: SRTS Programs That Reduce Traffic and Getting Results: SRTS Programs That Reduce Speeding and Distracted Driving.

Does the Safe Routes to School program require the installation of infrastructure that accomodates children with mobility impairments?

According to the Federal Program Guidance on Safe Routes to School:

Infrastructure projects constructed with these funds [federal aid funds] must be accessible to persons with disabilities, per the Americans with Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidelines (ADAAG) at 28 CFR Part 36, Appendix A, as enforced by the U.S. Department of Justice and FHWA, and as required under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act.

Explore other program tools:

Getting More Students to Walk and Bicycle: Four Elements of Successful Programs

Though some Safe Routes to School programs have to address safety problems first, most programs ultimately aim to increase walking and bicycling among students. Some programs yield a greater response than imagined; others start out by showing great promise, but end up not reaching their goals.

The National Center for Safe Routes to School, in an effort to better understand what factors might contribute to increases in walking and bicycling, examined programs for elements linked to measured walking and bicycling outcomes.

Authoring Organization: 
National Center for Safe Routes to School

Shifting Modes: A Comparative Analysis of SRTS Program Elements and Travel Mode Outcomes

This study explores how school-level dynamics that underlie the planning and implementation of SRTS programs relate to the percentage of students who walk and bicycle between home and school.

Do successful Safe Routes to School programs have something in common?

Shifting Modes: A Comparative Analysis of Safe Routes to School Program Elements and Travel Mode Outcomes identifies the following four key factors that successful SRTS programs share:

Authoring Organization: 
National Center for Safe Routes to School

Early Bird Registration Reminder for SRTS National Conference

Register by May 31 for the third Safe Routes to School National Conference, August 16 - 18, 2011, in Minneapolis and take advantage of a $50 early bird registration discount!

Whether you're new to Safe Routes to School or have experience to share, you're invited to attend this dynamic conference, advance your important work and build the connections - in your schools, streets and communities.

SRTS Education Grant Documentary from Fayetteville, Arkansas

Kids on Wheels documents the 2011 pilot year of Bike ED, a bicycle education program at all nine public elementary schools in Fayetteville, Arkansas conducted by the Bicycle Coalition of the Ozarks with a grant from Arkansas Safe Routes to School. Produced by Dan Dean and Ekaterina Romanova.

 

Authoring Organization: 
Bicycle Coalition of the Ozarks

Explore other program tools: