Program organization

New London, Iowa: New London Starts New SRTS Program

The Safe Routes to School (SRTS) committee in the City of New London, IA, is in the beginning phases of implementing its SRTS activities within the community.

Introduction

Athens, Georgia: Safe Routes Athens

Background Safe Routes Athens (SRA) was established in fall 2005 by the joint forces of the Clarke County School District and BikeAthens, a local non-profit organization that encourages walking and bicycling in the Athens community.

Introduction

Safe Routes Athens (SRA) was established in fall 2005 by the joint forces of the Clarke County School District and BikeAthens, a local non-profit organization that encourages walking and bicycling in the Athens community. SRA is a community effort, supported by volunteers wishing to promote Safe Routes to School (SRTS) activities and healthy living practices to the local school children.

Tampa, Florida: New partnerships support walking and biking in Tampa

Shaw Elementary School is a neighborhood K-5th Title 1 school with 597 students. Approximately 75 to 80 percent of the students live near enough to walk to school, but they face several barriers.

Introduction

Tampa, Florida: Safe Kids Tampa

Safe Kids Tampa, led by St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital of Tampa, has tailored its Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program.

Introduction

Safe Kids Tampa, led by St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital of Tampa, has tailored its Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program to meet the needs of both urban and suburban children in 25 area schools during the past two years.

Miami and Dade County, Florida: Pedestrian Safety Education Program Teaches Skills

Miami-Dade County had the highest incidence of pedestrian injuries and fatalities in the State and was third in the U.S. The rate of pediatric pedestrian injuries was also particularly high.

Introduction

Miami-Dade County had the highest incidence of pedestrian injuries and fatalities in the State and was third in the U.S. The rate of pediatric pedestrian injuries was also particularly high.

District 2 of the Florida DOT: Existing volunteer network spreads SRTS message

District 2 of Florida’s Department of Transportation manages a district-wide Safe Routes to School program that has provided pedestrian and bicycle safety outreach

Introduction

District 2 of Florida’s Department of Transportation manages a district-wide Safe Routes to School program that has provided pedestrian and bicycle safety outreach and education to more than 28,500 children in 605 schools since it began in September 2007.

The population of District 2 in northeastern Florida is more than 1.7 million in both urban and rural areas of 18 counties covering nearly 12,000 square miles. Its major cities include Gainesville, Jacksonville, Lake City, Amelia Island, Palatka, Perry, Saint Augustine and Starke.

Newark, Delaware: Big rewards encourage big results

Delaware's Safe Routes to School Program began in May 2004 after a SRTS Program was formally established through a bill that included starting pilot programs in schools throughout the state.

Introduction

Delaware: Delaware SRTS Program

September 10, 2002 marked the beginning of Delaware’s Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program when state SRTS legislation was signed into law.

Introduction

Washington, DC: Murch Elementary School builds consensus

Murch Elementary School built community consensus for Safe Routes to School (SRTS) efforts that enabled it to overcome barriers to walking and bicycling to school.

Introduction

Murch Elementary School built community consensus for Safe Routes to School (SRTS) efforts that enabled it to overcome barriers to walking and bicycling to school, to educate and encourage students to walk and ride to school, and to build sidewalks to make that trip safer. The school’s efforts earned it the 2009 James L. Oberstar Award for Safe Routes to School.

Spartanburg, South Carolina: Countywide effort pays off in Spartanburg, SC

The Safe Routes to School program in Spartanburg County, S.C. focuses on teaching safety, making the environment safer and increasing the number of families that are able to walk to school.

Introduction