Safe Routes Successes - Education

In September 2007, the Coconino County Health Department received $39,000 in federal funding awarded through the Arizona Department of Transportation to jumpstart its Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program.

Heatherwood Elementary increased the percentage of students regularly walking and bicycling from 12 percent to more than 43 percent in the first three years of the program.

The City of Holladay, Utah, decided to incorporate a Safe Sidewalks program into its city plans in 2003.

Alexandria, VA, is a compact city with more than 128,000 residents living in a 15 square mile area.

The first SRTS programs began at MacKinnon Middle and Duffy Elementary School, with the goal of encouraging more children to walk or bicycle to school.

Flippin, AR, is a rural town that is home to Flippin Elementary School, Flippin Middle School and Flippin High School.

In Fairhope, AL, regular walk-to-school events are scheduled to help create a sustainable program that will change behaviors and enhance the community’s walkability.

Since 2006, the number of walking school buses at Green Street School in Brattleboro, Vermont, has more than tripled, thanks to parents’ steady support of Safe Routes to School.

Melrose Elementary and Lawn Middle Schools in Jamestown, Rhode Island, have been concerned about students safely walking to school for several years.