Safe Routes Successes - Education

Alpine Elementary School, a K–6th grade school with 780 students, is part of Utah’s Alpine School District, the lowest funded school district in the nation.

District 2 of Florida’s Department of Transportation manages a district-wide Safe Routes to School program that has provided pedestrian and bicycle safety outreach

Melrose Elementary and Lawn Middle Schools in Jamestown, Rhode Island, have been concerned about students safely walking to school for several years.

In 2006, Muscle Powered, a local walking and bicycling advocacy group in Carson City, Nev., initiated a project to pilot a Walk to School program at two elementary schools using a $12,000 grant from the Nevada Office of Traffic Safety.

September 10, 2002 marked the beginning of Delaware’s Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program when state SRTS legislation was signed into law.

Roosevelt Middle School and the surrounding community of Eugene, Oregon, have successfully developed a team of community organizations committed to providing Safe Routes to School (SRTS) for children.

Because of its rural setting, Longview Elementary School and the Moses Lake community faced unique issues surrounding child safety and safer walking programs.

Neighborhoods and schools in Taylor will be connected with a 2.4-mile pedestrian and bike path to make the way to school safer for elementary, middle and high school students.

Jericho Elementary School, a kindergarten through fourth grade school faced two obstacles in creating a Safe Routes to School program: few students living within walking distance, and a highway next to the school.