Safe Routes Successes - Encouragement

Michigan is one of the most "overweight states," which provided a big incentive for community leaders to try to get children active at a young age and ingrain that activity so that it will be habit later in life.

Cleveland Elementary is located in urban Oklahoma City. Wanting to increase the amount of physical activity among students, school staff and community leaders organized an event to encourage walking and bicycling to school.

Henry Zarrow International is a kindergarten through fifth grade magnet school in Tulsa, Okla. Being a magnet school, students, if accepted, can attend Zarrow regardless of the distance.

In Tell City, IN, a $250,000 award in Safe Routes to School (SRTS) funds from the Indiana Department of Transportation (IDOT) and a $29,347 grant from the city will fund a 1.2 mile pedestrian and bicycle sidewalk system

Hillside students walk to downtown Allegan because it serves as a classroom for them to practice life skills.

The Smyrna School District and the Town of Smyrna identified the goal of improving safety for children who already were walking and bicycling to school.

In August 2000, the Marin County Bicycle Coalition was funded by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to participate in a Safe Routes to School pilot program.

Huntingdon is a small town in a rural community in Carroll County, Tenn., that is working with Huntingdon Primary School and Huntingdon Middle School to create a safer pedestrian and bicycle environment for its children.

More than 4,000 Portland metro area students from 30 schools signed up to compete against Portland State University (PSU) students in the Portland May 2008 Walk + Bike Challenge Month.