Safe Routes Successes - Encouragement

Since its inception in February 2006, the Connecticut Department of Transportation’s (ConnDOT) Safe Routes to School (SRTS) Program has awarded approximately $1.6 million.

Broad Street Elementary School is located in the borough of Mechanicsburg, an older section of town where the traditional pattern of the blocks make it a great place to walk.

In 2003, Patricia Parsons, a health promotion specialist for Chronic Disease Prevention at the Benton County Health Department, decided to implement a sustainable program to help prevent childhood obesity.

Jericho Elementary School, a kindergarten through fourth grade school faced two obstacles in creating a Safe Routes to School program: few students living within walking distance, and a highway next to the school.

The Non-Motorized Transportation Pilot Project (NMTPP) in Sheboygan County, WI, was borne out of federal transportation legislation in 2005.

Safe Routes Chagrin is a truly cooperative endeavor which has improved safety and encouraged more students to walk and bike while building a sustainable program supported by the entire community.

What began as a sidewalks infrastructure project along routes to schools in Coeur d’Alene blossomed into something bigger.

Cleveland Elementary is located in urban Oklahoma City. Wanting to increase the amount of physical activity among students, school staff and community leaders organized an event to encourage walking and bicycling to school.

Safe Kids Tampa, led by St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital of Tampa, has tailored its Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program.