Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

The city of West Lafayette decided to develop and implement a Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program to improve the conditions for the children who walk to the schools.

Students in Green Forest, AR, literally are leading the way to help the city identify improvements needed to make routes safer for children to walk to school.

In 2007, the city and  school system received a $102,919 SRTS infrastructure grant from the Missouri Department of Transportation to install uniform safety signage and flashing beacons at 8 different schools throughout the city.

Safe Routes to School is a fully institutionalized program at Oakbrook Middle School, but this was not always the case. 

The village of Ossining, NY, is located within Westchester County, NY, along the Hudson River. The necessary busing program and a lack of physical infrastructure prevent many children from walking to school.

The Parent Teachers Association (PTA) at Challenger Elementary School in Huntsville, Ala., has organized Walk to School Day in conjunction with International Walk to School Day for five years.
 

Faced with increasing pedestrian injuries and deaths, Pitt County formed the Walk this Way Pedestrian Safety Task Force, whose members share a common goal: to make the community safer for pedestrians.

Northeast Elementary School began an SRTS program five years ago that utilizes the generosity of the community — and the creativity of the school staff — to provide incentives to encourage students to walk to school.

In 1995, the Auburn School District linked concerns about the high cost of transportation and increased childhood obesity to create cooperation that has led to 20 percent of its district’s students walking to school.