Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

Plain City, UT, is a small town of about 5,000 citizens. On June 27, 2006, the Weber County School District passed a bond to build a new elementary school in Plain City.

In summer 2007, Mississippi’s Department of Transportation announced that Petal would receive $213,028 in federal Safe Routes to School funds.

For the past 20 years Safe Kids, a group focused on injury prevention in children, has worked with the Grand Forks school district, in Grand Forks, N.D., to encourage its students to walk and bicycle safely to school.

Rosa Guerrero Elementary is a Title 1 neighborhood school, and 75 percent of the 850 students live within walking distance of the school.

Hillside students walk to downtown Allegan because it serves as a classroom for them to practice life skills.

In 2002, a federal judge ended a 25-year-old program of cross-town busing in Dayton, OH. As a result, pedestrian and bicycle safety has become one of the most critical issues facing the city.

Pierre, S.D., is a rural town with approximately 13,000 residents. One of its local elementary schools, Jefferson Elementary School, has more than 400 students in kindergarten through fifth grade.

The Garfield Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program targets two neighborhood schools, Woodrow Wilson #5 and Roosevelt #7.

Safe Routes Nebraska is the Nebraska Department of Roads’ state-level implementation of the federal Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program.