Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

Arlington began working with the National Park Service Rivers and Tails program and the MassHighway department to start a SRTS program in two elementary schools and one middle school.

For several years the City of Rockville has coordinated Safe Routes to School programs in Rockville schools with an emphasis on education, enforcement, encouragement programs, and transportation improvements.

In spring 2007, Holdrege Public Schools in Holdrege, NE, applied for and received two federal Safe Routes to School (SRTS) grants.

The Non-Motorized Transportation Pilot Project (NMTPP) in Sheboygan County, WI, was borne out of federal transportation legislation in 2005.

The Montana Nutrition and Physical Activity Program at Montana State University in Bozeman, in collaboration with the local Safe Routes to School (SRTS) Task Force, initiated a SRTS pilot program at the Emily Dickinson Elementary School.

Starkville in Motion (SIM), a volunteer organization formed in 2005, is dedicated to increasing the number of bicycle and pedestrian paths in Starkville.

Alexandria, VA, is a compact city with more than 128,000 residents living in a 15 square mile area.

Massachusetts’ commitment to safe school routes and more physically active student travel predates the federal Safe Routes to School legislation.

The United School District 416 in Louisburg, KS, applied for received $174,297 in reimbursable funds from Safe Routes to School (SRTS) through the Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT).