Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

The Non-Motorized Transportation Pilot Project (NMTPP) in Sheboygan County, WI, was borne out of federal transportation legislation in 2005.

In Tell City, IN, a $250,000 award in Safe Routes to School (SRTS) funds from the Indiana Department of Transportation (IDOT) and a $29,347 grant from the city will fund a 1.2 mile pedestrian and bicycle sidewalk system

The Montana Nutrition and Physical Activity Program at Montana State University in Bozeman, in collaboration with the local Safe Routes to School (SRTS) Task Force, initiated a SRTS pilot program at the Emily Dickinson Elementary School.

In May 2003, Michigan’s Department of Transportation (DOT), in partnership with other organizations, convened a mini-conference.

Working together, the Village of Machesney Park, IL, and the Harlem School District received funding for a twofold approach to make the routes to school safer for children.

When the PedNet Coalition in Columbia, MO organized daily Walking School Buses at West Boulevard Elementary School in fall 2006, only fifteen of the nearly 300 kindergarten through fifth grade students participated regularly.

Pierre, S.D., is a rural town with approximately 13,000 residents. One of its local elementary schools, Jefferson Elementary School, has more than 400 students in kindergarten through fifth grade.

Massachusetts’ commitment to safe school routes and more physically active student travel predates the federal Safe Routes to School legislation.

The village of Ossining, NY, is located within Westchester County, NY, along the Hudson River. The necessary busing program and a lack of physical infrastructure prevent many children from walking to school.