Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

When officials from the Town of Pleasant View saw that children were walking to school—even without sidewalks—they decided to take action.

Arlington began working with the National Park Service Rivers and Tails program and the MassHighway department to start a SRTS program in two elementary schools and one middle school.

Jericho Elementary School, a kindergarten through fourth grade school faced two obstacles in creating a Safe Routes to School program: few students living within walking distance, and a highway next to the school.

Putney Central School is a kindergarten through eighth grade school in Putney, Vermont, a rural area with a town population of approximately 2,600 residents.

Longfellow Elementary School has participated in Walk to School Day for more than ten years and just joined Safe Routes to School.

Massachusetts’ commitment to safe school routes and more physically active student travel predates the federal Safe Routes to School legislation.

A photo-visioning project was conducted in two fifth grade classes at Franklin Elementary School in La Crosse, WI.

In 2002, a federal judge ended a 25-year-old program of cross-town busing in Dayton, OH. As a result, pedestrian and bicycle safety has become one of the most critical issues facing the city.

Safe Routes Nebraska is the Nebraska Department of Roads’ state-level implementation of the federal Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program.