Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

The Nebraska Department of Roads (NDOR) launched Safe Routes Nebraska (SRN) in October 2006.

The Denver Osteopathic Foundation partnered with Denver Public Schools to launch a Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program to increase walking and bicycling at Ellis Elementary and other schools in Denver, Colo.

Faced with increasing pedestrian injuries and deaths, Pitt County formed the Walk this Way Pedestrian Safety Task Force, whose members share a common goal: to make the community safer for pedestrians.

Hillside students walk to downtown Allegan because it serves as a classroom for them to practice life skills.

For several years the City of Rockville has coordinated Safe Routes to School programs in Rockville schools with an emphasis on education, enforcement, encouragement programs, and transportation improvements.

Michigan is one of the most "overweight states," which provided a big incentive for community leaders to try to get children active at a young age and ingrain that activity so that it will be habit later in life.

September 10, 2002 marked the beginning of Delaware’s Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program when state SRTS legislation was signed into law.

Thanks to the efforts of one energetic parent, Ira B. Jones Elementary School in Asheville, N.C., has been participating in International Walk to School Day for a number of years.

Working together, township officials, county police, parents and school staff applied for and received $456,000 in Safe Routes to School (SRTS) funding from the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) to create a SRTS program.