Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

MDOT agreed to fund a SRTS study identifying education, encouragement, enforcement and engineering projects that would increase the safety of students walking and bicycling to school.

The kindergarten through sixth grade students at Shelley Elementary School in American Fork, UT, have no bus system to take them to and from school.

Starkville in Motion (SIM), a volunteer organization formed in 2005, is dedicated to increasing the number of bicycle and pedestrian paths in Starkville.

Flippin, AR, is a rural town that is home to Flippin Elementary School, Flippin Middle School and Flippin High School.

The City of Holladay, Utah, decided to incorporate a Safe Sidewalks program into its city plans in 2003.

The Garfield Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program targets two neighborhood schools, Woodrow Wilson #5 and Roosevelt #7.

Rosa Guerrero Elementary is a Title 1 neighborhood school, and 75 percent of the 850 students live within walking distance of the school.

Maine initiated its Safe Routes to School (ME-SRTS) programming after the development of the national program in 2005.

Michigan is one of the most "overweight states," which provided a big incentive for community leaders to try to get children active at a young age and ingrain that activity so that it will be habit later in life.