Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

Following a five-year plan has helped the city of Amory and its school district take steps to make neighborhoods safer for children to walk and bicycle to school.

Working together, the Village of Machesney Park, IL, and the Harlem School District received funding for a twofold approach to make the routes to school safer for children.

In 1995, the Auburn School District linked concerns about the high cost of transportation and increased childhood obesity to create cooperation that has led to 20 percent of its district’s students walking to school.

The Nebraska Department of Roads (NDOR) launched Safe Routes Nebraska (SRN) in October 2006.

Roosevelt Middle School and the surrounding community of Eugene, Oregon, have successfully developed a team of community organizations committed to providing Safe Routes to School (SRTS) for children.

The Garfield Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program targets two neighborhood schools, Woodrow Wilson #5 and Roosevelt #7.

Despite the extraordinary economic challenges faced in Hamtramck, Mich., community leaders, local foundations and state government worked together to build a strong Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program.

In 2007, the city and  school system received a $102,919 SRTS infrastructure grant from the Missouri Department of Transportation to install uniform safety signage and flashing beacons at 8 different schools throughout the city.

Wilmette, IL, is a town near Chicago with a population of 28,000 people.