Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

The Kansas SRTS program has established itself as an influential and innovative state program.

Sherwood Forest Elementary School in Winston-Salem, NC, is making strides in its efforts to encourage safe walking to school.

In summer 2005, the Maine Department of Transportation, through the Bicycle/Pedestrian Program, constructed a 0.6 mile long sidewalk that connects the library in the elementary school complex to a community park.

Parents at Bear Creek Elementary School in Boulder, Colo., are leading students and the entire school community into life-changing choices.

The Duluth-Superior Metropolitan Interstate Council (MIC) is the designated Metropolitan Planning Organization for the Duluth-Superior metropolitan area and began Safe Routes to School planning initiatives in the area.

Chula Vista is in southwest California and has the largest kindergarten through sixth grade district in the state.

For the past 20 years Safe Kids, a group focused on injury prevention in children, has worked with the Grand Forks school district, in Grand Forks, N.D., to encourage its students to walk and bicycle safely to school.

Washington’s Safe Routes to School (W-SRTS) program began in 2004, when the Washington State legislature funded a Safe Routes to School pilot project.

In Tell City, IN, a $250,000 award in Safe Routes to School (SRTS) funds from the Indiana Department of Transportation (IDOT) and a $29,347 grant from the city will fund a 1.2 mile pedestrian and bicycle sidewalk system