Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

MDOT agreed to fund a SRTS study identifying education, encouragement, enforcement and engineering projects that would increase the safety of students walking and bicycling to school.

The Duluth-Superior Metropolitan Interstate Council (MIC) is the designated Metropolitan Planning Organization for the Duluth-Superior metropolitan area and began Safe Routes to School planning initiatives in the area.

A joint Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program was necessary because the schools are in a suburban area where nearby residents can walk to school.

Partnerships throughout the community enabled McCook Elementary School to develop a Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program.

The Non-Motorized Transportation Pilot Project (NMTPP) in Sheboygan County, WI, was borne out of federal transportation legislation in 2005.

Following a five-year plan has helped the city of Amory and its school district take steps to make neighborhoods safer for children to walk and bicycle to school.

Huntingdon is a small town in a rural community in Carroll County, Tenn., that is working with Huntingdon Primary School and Huntingdon Middle School to create a safer pedestrian and bicycle environment for its children.

Washington’s Safe Routes to School (W-SRTS) program began in 2004, when the Washington State legislature funded a Safe Routes to School pilot project.

The City of Holladay, Utah, decided to incorporate a Safe Sidewalks program into its city plans in 2003.