Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

Michigan is one of the most "overweight states," which provided a big incentive for community leaders to try to get children active at a young age and ingrain that activity so that it will be habit later in life.

The City of Holladay, Utah, decided to incorporate a Safe Sidewalks program into its city plans in 2003.

Northeast Elementary School began an SRTS program five years ago that utilizes the generosity of the community — and the creativity of the school staff — to provide incentives to encourage students to walk to school.

Safe Routes to School is a fully institutionalized program at Oakbrook Middle School, but this was not always the case. 

In summer 2007, Mississippi’s Department of Transportation announced that Petal would receive $213,028 in federal Safe Routes to School funds.

Before Congress passed the SAFETEA-LU transportation legislation in 2005, the Las Cruces Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) in Las Cruces, NM, adopted Safe Routes to School (SRTS) policies into its transportation plan.

Eldorado K-8 School in Superior, CO has more than 1,000 students, and more than 950 of them living within two miles of the school.

Anchorage, Alaska, has a winter dark period lasting from October until April, in which the sun rises as late as 10:00 a.m. and sets as early as 3:30 p.m.

To begin improving pedestrian safety, an AmeriCorps volunteer surveyed students and parents at each of the three schools to determine the number of students who walked, bicycled, rode in a private vehicle or rode the bus the school.