Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

Faced with increasing pedestrian injuries and deaths, Pitt County formed the Walk this Way Pedestrian Safety Task Force, whose members share a common goal: to make the community safer for pedestrians.

Go! Chapel Hill Active Living by Design is a national program that helped to facilitate the spread and success of the Active Routes to School program in Chapel Hill.

The first Walking and Wheeling Day at Lake Norman Elementary School in Mooresville, NC, was inspired by none other than one persistent third grade student at the school.

September 10, 2002 marked the beginning of Delaware’s Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program when state SRTS legislation was signed into law.

In Maryland, the state Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program is administered by the Maryland State Highway Administration (SHA) through the Regional and Intermodal Planning Division (RIPD). 

Safe Kids Tampa, led by St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital of Tampa, has tailored its Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program.

Before Congress passed the SAFETEA-LU transportation legislation in 2005, the Las Cruces Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) in Las Cruces, NM, adopted Safe Routes to School (SRTS) policies into its transportation plan.

To begin improving pedestrian safety, an AmeriCorps volunteer surveyed students and parents at each of the three schools to determine the number of students who walked, bicycled, rode in a private vehicle or rode the bus the school.

Northeast Elementary School began an SRTS program five years ago that utilizes the generosity of the community — and the creativity of the school staff — to provide incentives to encourage students to walk to school.