Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

In summer 2005, the Maine Department of Transportation, through the Bicycle/Pedestrian Program, constructed a 0.6 mile long sidewalk that connects the library in the elementary school complex to a community park.

Partnerships throughout the community enabled McCook Elementary School to develop a Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program.

During the fall 2008 school year at Pawnee Elementary School in the City of Overland Park, KS, students will have a new bus stop to wait at — the pick-up area for the Walking School Bus.

Recognizing that one of the most critical factors regarding the safety of children walking to school is motor vehicular speed, the Washington Area Bicyclist Association (WABA) instituted the DC Neighborhood Pace Car pilot program.

In Fairhope, AL, regular walk-to-school events are scheduled to help create a sustainable program that will change behaviors and enhance the community’s walkability.

Anchorage, Alaska, has a winter dark period lasting from October until April, in which the sun rises as late as 10:00 a.m. and sets as early as 3:30 p.m.

The Mid-America Regional Council (MARC), a regional planning organization for Greater Kansas City, is training people to become “Safety Ambassadors".

Building community partnerships has bolstered the Safe Routes to School (SRTS) Program at Kimberley Park Elementary School.

Washington’s Safe Routes to School (W-SRTS) program began in 2004, when the Washington State legislature funded a Safe Routes to School pilot project.