Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

The first Walking and Wheeling Day at Lake Norman Elementary School in Mooresville, NC, was inspired by none other than one persistent third grade student at the school.

The City of Holladay, Utah, decided to incorporate a Safe Sidewalks program into its city plans in 2003.

Dishman-McGinnis Elementary School, as well as four other elementary schools in Bowling Green, KY, has been implementing a SRTS program since 2006.

It took coordination and cooperation among Hillside Elementary School, the Schenectady County Traffic Safety Program and Cornell Cooperative Extension, Schenectady County to organize a successful pedestrian safety program.

Three years ago Principal Edgar Miranda moved from Rochester, NY to Arlington, VA, and he rented a home in the neighborhood near Ashlawn Elementary School where he would work.

The Denver Osteopathic Foundation partnered with Denver Public Schools to launch a Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program to increase walking and bicycling at Ellis Elementary and other schools in Denver, Colo.

A grassroots program, Healthy Waltham Initiative, brought the Executive Office of Transportation’s Massachusetts Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program to Whittemore Elementary School in Waltham, Mass.

For the past 20 years Safe Kids, a group focused on injury prevention in children, has worked with the Grand Forks school district, in Grand Forks, N.D., to encourage its students to walk and bicycle safely to school.

When officials from the Town of Pleasant View saw that children were walking to school—even without sidewalks—they decided to take action.