Safe Routes Successes - Engineering

The Village of Canal Winchester, OH, has two elementary schools located near one another on the same campus.  In April 2008, the Village of Canal Winchester had a kick-off meeting for its SRTS projects.

In Tell City, IN, a $250,000 award in Safe Routes to School (SRTS) funds from the Indiana Department of Transportation (IDOT) and a $29,347 grant from the city will fund a 1.2 mile pedestrian and bicycle sidewalk system

To begin improving pedestrian safety, an AmeriCorps volunteer surveyed students and parents at each of the three schools to determine the number of students who walked, bicycled, rode in a private vehicle or rode the bus the school.

Neighborhoods and schools in Taylor will be connected with a 2.4-mile pedestrian and bike path to make the way to school safer for elementary, middle and high school students.

Murch Elementary School built community consensus for Safe Routes to School (SRTS) efforts that enabled it to overcome barriers to walking and bicycling to school.

Michigan is one of the most "overweight states," which provided a big incentive for community leaders to try to get children active at a young age and ingrain that activity so that it will be habit later in life.

What began as a sidewalks infrastructure project along routes to schools in Coeur d’Alene blossomed into something bigger.

September 10, 2002 marked the beginning of Delaware’s Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program when state SRTS legislation was signed into law.