Safe Routes Successes - Engineering

Alpine Elementary School, a K–6th grade school with 780 students, is part of Utah’s Alpine School District, the lowest funded school district in the nation.

The Forest Park Elementary School PTA utilized strengths of its parent volunteers.

September 10, 2002 marked the beginning of Delaware’s Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program when state SRTS legislation was signed into law.

Working together, the Village of Machesney Park, IL, and the Harlem School District received funding for a twofold approach to make the routes to school safer for children.

Neighborhoods and schools in Taylor will be connected with a 2.4-mile pedestrian and bike path to make the way to school safer for elementary, middle and high school students.

To begin improving pedestrian safety, an AmeriCorps volunteer surveyed students and parents at each of the three schools to determine the number of students who walked, bicycled, rode in a private vehicle or rode the bus the school.

Safe Kids Tampa, led by St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital of Tampa, has tailored its Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program.

In Tell City, IN, a $250,000 award in Safe Routes to School (SRTS) funds from the Indiana Department of Transportation (IDOT) and a $29,347 grant from the city will fund a 1.2 mile pedestrian and bicycle sidewalk system

Hillside students walk to downtown Allegan because it serves as a classroom for them to practice life skills.