Safe Routes Successes - Engineering

To begin improving pedestrian safety, an AmeriCorps volunteer surveyed students and parents at each of the three schools to determine the number of students who walked, bicycled, rode in a private vehicle or rode the bus the school.

The Forest Park Elementary School PTA utilized strengths of its parent volunteers.

Background The town of Bethel, CT, has built its three elementary schools, one middle school and one high school within the same educational complex.

Johnson City, Tenn., is an urban community with more than 65,000 residents. Along with Bristol and Kingsport, Tenn., Johnson City forms the tri-cities metro area, home to more than one million people.

In 1995, the Auburn School District linked concerns about the high cost of transportation and increased childhood obesity to create cooperation that has led to 20 percent of its district’s students walking to school.

What began as a sidewalks infrastructure project along routes to schools in Coeur d’Alene blossomed into something bigger.

During the 2006 school year at Maryville Elementary in Maryville, IL, 12 children regularly walked or bicycled to school.

Naramake Elementary School and Nathan Hale Middle School are located on Strawberry Hill Avenue, a minor arterial street in Norwalk, Connecticut.

In September 2007, the Coconino County Health Department received $39,000 in federal funding awarded through the Arizona Department of Transportation to jumpstart its Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program.