Safe Routes Successes - Engineering

Michigan is one of the most "overweight states," which provided a big incentive for community leaders to try to get children active at a young age and ingrain that activity so that it will be habit later in life.

Hillside students walk to downtown Allegan because it serves as a classroom for them to practice life skills.

Alpine Elementary School, a K–6th grade school with 780 students, is part of Utah’s Alpine School District, the lowest funded school district in the nation.

During the 2006 school year at Maryville Elementary in Maryville, IL, 12 children regularly walked or bicycled to school.

Nine elementary and middle schools in Mansfield, OH, received funding for Safe Routes to School (SRTS) infrastructure and non-infrastructure projects through the Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT).

Safe Kids Tampa, led by St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital of Tampa, has tailored its Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program.

During the late 1980s and early 1990s, the City of Green River, Wyo., began construction on the Greenbelt Pathways and Trail System.

In September 2007, the Coconino County Health Department received $39,000 in federal funding awarded through the Arizona Department of Transportation to jumpstart its Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program.