Safe Routes Successes - Funding and Policy

Foothill Elementary School in Boulder, CO, had been participating in International Walk to School Day for several years before a group of parents joined forces.

The United School District 416 in Louisburg, KS, applied for received $174,297 in reimbursable funds from Safe Routes to School (SRTS) through the Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT).

Johnson City, Tenn., is an urban community with more than 65,000 residents. Along with Bristol and Kingsport, Tenn., Johnson City forms the tri-cities metro area, home to more than one million people.

The West Virginia Safe Routes to School (WV-SRTS) program accomplished many goals during the 2007 fiscal year.

Students in Green Forest, AR, literally are leading the way to help the city identify improvements needed to make routes safer for children to walk to school.

As one of the first states to enact Safe Routes to School legislation and the home to one of two original pilot SRTS projects, California has been a leader in the national SRTS movement for nearly a decade.

In September 2007, the Coconino County Health Department received $39,000 in federal funding awarded through the Arizona Department of Transportation to jumpstart its Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program.

Maricopa County Department of Public Health- Office of Health Promotion and Education in 2008 began working with Griffith Elementary School on “Walk n-Rollers.”

Chula Vista is in southwest California and has the largest kindergarten through sixth grade district in the state.