Safe Routes Successes - Funding and Policy

Chula Vista is in southwest California and has the largest kindergarten through sixth grade district in the state.

Huntingdon is a small town in a rural community in Carroll County, Tenn., that is working with Huntingdon Primary School and Huntingdon Middle School to create a safer pedestrian and bicycle environment for its children.

More than 4,000 Portland metro area students from 30 schools signed up to compete against Portland State University (PSU) students in the Portland May 2008 Walk + Bike Challenge Month.

During the 2007 to 2008 school year, the Sherman School District and the town of Sherman, IL, applied for and received $247,975 in Safe Routes to School (SRTS) funding from the Illinois Department of Transportation (IL DOT).

Nine elementary and middle schools in Mansfield, OH, received funding for Safe Routes to School (SRTS) infrastructure and non-infrastructure projects through the Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT).

Roosevelt Middle School and the surrounding community of Eugene, Oregon, have successfully developed a team of community organizations committed to providing Safe Routes to School (SRTS) for children.

Since 2006, the number of walking school buses at Green Street School in Brattleboro, Vermont, has more than tripled, thanks to parents’ steady support of Safe Routes to School.

The West Virginia Safe Routes to School (WV-SRTS) program accomplished many goals during the 2007 fiscal year.

Establishing a broad base of community partnerships has enabled the City of Garfield to begin a Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program that can sustain itself.