Safe Routes Successes - Funding and Policy

Jericho Elementary School, a kindergarten through fourth grade school faced two obstacles in creating a Safe Routes to School program: few students living within walking distance, and a highway next to the school.

Since its inception in February 2006, the Connecticut Department of Transportation’s (ConnDOT) Safe Routes to School (SRTS) Program has awarded approximately $1.6 million.

The City of Holladay, Utah, decided to incorporate a Safe Sidewalks program into its city plans in 2003.

Students in Green Forest, AR, literally are leading the way to help the city identify improvements needed to make routes safer for children to walk to school.

Putney Central School is a kindergarten through eighth grade school in Putney, Vermont, a rural area with a town population of approximately 2,600 residents.

The Village of Canal Winchester, OH, has two elementary schools located near one another on the same campus.  In April 2008, the Village of Canal Winchester had a kick-off meeting for its SRTS projects.

Delaware's Safe Routes to School Program began in May 2004 after a SRTS Program was formally established through a bill that included starting pilot programs in schools throughout the state.

The village of Ossining, NY, is located within Westchester County, NY, along the Hudson River. The necessary busing program and a lack of physical infrastructure prevent many children from walking to school.

Wilmette, IL, is a town near Chicago with a population of 28,000 people.