Safe Routes Successes - Funding and Policy

District 2 of Florida’s Department of Transportation manages a district-wide Safe Routes to School program that has provided pedestrian and bicycle safety outreach

Students in Green Forest, AR, literally are leading the way to help the city identify improvements needed to make routes safer for children to walk to school.

Delaware's Safe Routes to School Program began in May 2004 after a SRTS Program was formally established through a bill that included starting pilot programs in schools throughout the state.

Plain City, UT, is a small town of about 5,000 citizens. On June 27, 2006, the Weber County School District passed a bond to build a new elementary school in Plain City.

At two elementary schools in Orlando, FL, nutrition and pedestrian and bicycle safety skills are taught in unison to help children create healthier lifestyles for themselves.

As one of the first states to enact Safe Routes to School legislation and the home to one of two original pilot SRTS projects, California has been a leader in the national SRTS movement for nearly a decade.

Washington’s Safe Routes to School (W-SRTS) program began in 2004, when the Washington State legislature funded a Safe Routes to School pilot project.

During the 2007 to 2008 school year, the Sherman School District and the town of Sherman, IL, applied for and received $247,975 in Safe Routes to School (SRTS) funding from the Illinois Department of Transportation (IL DOT).

In 1995, the Auburn School District linked concerns about the high cost of transportation and increased childhood obesity to create cooperation that has led to 20 percent of its district’s students walking to school.