Safe Routes Successes - Funding and Policy

With the passage of the federal transportation legislation, SAFETEA-LU, in August 2005, the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) began implementing its Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program.

The Safe Routes to School program in Gilbert, AZ, focuses on promoting walking and bicycling to school with the help of partnerships with 30 schools in two school districts and with community organizations.

The Village of Canal Winchester, OH, has two elementary schools located near one another on the same campus.  In April 2008, the Village of Canal Winchester had a kick-off meeting for its SRTS projects.

Safe Routes to School coordinators at State Street School listened to parents while developing a program anchored by walking school buses that address worries about safety of children walking and bicycling to school.

Neighborhoods and schools in Taylor will be connected with a 2.4-mile pedestrian and bike path to make the way to school safer for elementary, middle and high school students.

Alpine Elementary School, a K–6th grade school with 780 students, is part of Utah’s Alpine School District, the lowest funded school district in the nation.

Rosa Guerrero Elementary is a Title 1 neighborhood school, and 75 percent of the 850 students live within walking distance of the school.

Plain City, UT, is a small town of about 5,000 citizens. On June 27, 2006, the Weber County School District passed a bond to build a new elementary school in Plain City.

In 1995, the Auburn School District linked concerns about the high cost of transportation and increased childhood obesity to create cooperation that has led to 20 percent of its district’s students walking to school.