Safe Routes Successes - Funding and Policy

Jericho Elementary School, a kindergarten through fourth grade school faced two obstacles in creating a Safe Routes to School program: few students living within walking distance, and a highway next to the school.

In 1995, the Auburn School District linked concerns about the high cost of transportation and increased childhood obesity to create cooperation that has led to 20 percent of its district’s students walking to school.

The Safe Routes to School (SRTS) committee in the City of New London, IA, is in the beginning phases of implementing its SRTS activities within the community.

Putney Central School is a kindergarten through eighth grade school in Putney, Vermont, a rural area with a town population of approximately 2,600 residents.

The Safe Routes to School program in Gilbert, AZ, focuses on promoting walking and bicycling to school with the help of partnerships with 30 schools in two school districts and with community organizations.

Johnson City, Tenn., is an urban community with more than 65,000 residents. Along with Bristol and Kingsport, Tenn., Johnson City forms the tri-cities metro area, home to more than one million people.

The community of Montpelier, VT, is promoting a different “Way To Go,” through an assortment of incentives and partnerships designed to help the program sustain itself in the future.

More than 4,000 Portland metro area students from 30 schools signed up to compete against Portland State University (PSU) students in the Portland May 2008 Walk + Bike Challenge Month.

Naramake Elementary School and Nathan Hale Middle School are located on Strawberry Hill Avenue, a minor arterial street in Norwalk, Connecticut.