Safe Routes Successes - Funding and Policy

Two Lawton, Oklahoma, schools have begun walking school buses to address different challenges, and both schools have seen unexpected benefits from their efforts.

When officials from the Town of Pleasant View saw that children were walking to school—even without sidewalks—they decided to take action.

The federal Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program acted as a catalyst for New Plymouth, ID, to concentrate its efforts to improve safety and to encourage students to walk and bicycle to school.

Parents at Bear Creek Elementary School in Boulder, Colo., are leading students and the entire school community into life-changing choices.

Delaware's Safe Routes to School Program began in May 2004 after a SRTS Program was formally established through a bill that included starting pilot programs in schools throughout the state.

Johnson City, Tenn., is an urban community with more than 65,000 residents. Along with Bristol and Kingsport, Tenn., Johnson City forms the tri-cities metro area, home to more than one million people.

The Safe Routes to School program in Spartanburg County, S.C. focuses on teaching safety, making the environment safer and increasing the number of families that are able to walk to school.

In March 2006, Safe Routes Chattanooga was awarded $364,000 in Safe Routes to School federal funds through the Tennessee Department of Transportation to be distributed to seven schools in Hamilton County.

Putney Central School is a kindergarten through eighth grade school in Putney, Vermont, a rural area with a town population of approximately 2,600 residents.