Safe Routes Successes - Funding and Policy

The kindergarten through sixth grade students at Shelley Elementary School in American Fork, UT, have no bus system to take them to and from school.

Chula Vista is in southwest California and has the largest kindergarten through sixth grade district in the state.

Officials from Dubuque, IA, decided to develop a comprehensive pedestrian plan to seek input from all 29 schools in the district.

The United School District 416 in Louisburg, KS, applied for received $174,297 in reimbursable funds from Safe Routes to School (SRTS) through the Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT).

Abernathy Elementary, Middle, and High School are on the same campus along a busy road. At least half of the students live within walking distance of the schools, but there are no sidewalks to help them reach the school safely.

Orleans Elementary School, a kindergarten through eighth grade school in the village of Orleans, VT, has participated in International Walk to School day since 2006.

In March 2006, Safe Routes Chattanooga was awarded $364,000 in Safe Routes to School federal funds through the Tennessee Department of Transportation to be distributed to seven schools in Hamilton County.

Washington’s Safe Routes to School (W-SRTS) program began in 2004, when the Washington State legislature funded a Safe Routes to School pilot project.

Roosevelt Middle School and the surrounding community of Eugene, Oregon, have successfully developed a team of community organizations committed to providing Safe Routes to School (SRTS) for children.