Safe Routes Successes - Funding and Policy

Alpine Elementary School, a K–6th grade school with 780 students, is part of Utah’s Alpine School District, the lowest funded school district in the nation.

Safe Kids Tampa, led by St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital of Tampa, has tailored its Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program.

Putney Central School is a kindergarten through eighth grade school in Putney, Vermont, a rural area with a town population of approximately 2,600 residents.

Recently, Mountain Rides Transportation Authority, a alternative transportation provider, and the Cities of Bellevue, Hailey and Ketchum in Blaine County, ID, received a grant for $312,000.

Washington’s Safe Routes to School (W-SRTS) program began in 2004, when the Washington State legislature funded a Safe Routes to School pilot project.

The kindergarten through sixth grade students at Shelley Elementary School in American Fork, UT, have no bus system to take them to and from school.

When officials from the Town of Pleasant View saw that children were walking to school—even without sidewalks—they decided to take action.

The first SRTS programs began at MacKinnon Middle and Duffy Elementary School, with the goal of encouraging more children to walk or bicycle to school.

Jericho Elementary School, a kindergarten through fourth grade school faced two obstacles in creating a Safe Routes to School program: few students living within walking distance, and a highway next to the school.