Safe Routes Successes - Funding and Policy

The village of Ossining, NY, is located within Westchester County, NY, along the Hudson River. The necessary busing program and a lack of physical infrastructure prevent many children from walking to school.

Establishing a broad base of community partnerships has enabled the City of Garfield to begin a Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program that can sustain itself.

The community of Montpelier, VT, is promoting a different “Way To Go,” through an assortment of incentives and partnerships designed to help the program sustain itself in the future.

The kindergarten through sixth grade students at Shelley Elementary School in American Fork, UT, have no bus system to take them to and from school.

Shaw Elementary School is a neighborhood K-5th Title 1 school with 597 students. Approximately 75 to 80 percent of the students live near enough to walk to school, but they face several barriers.

Since its inception in February 2006, the Connecticut Department of Transportation’s (ConnDOT) Safe Routes to School (SRTS) Program has awarded approximately $1.6 million.

The Smyrna School District and the Town of Smyrna identified the goal of improving safety for children who already were walking and bicycling to school.

In 1995, the Auburn School District linked concerns about the high cost of transportation and increased childhood obesity to create cooperation that has led to 20 percent of its district’s students walking to school.

Plain City, UT, is a small town of about 5,000 citizens. On June 27, 2006, the Weber County School District passed a bond to build a new elementary school in Plain City.