Safe Routes Successes - Funding and Policy

In March 2006, Safe Routes Chattanooga was awarded $364,000 in Safe Routes to School federal funds through the Tennessee Department of Transportation to be distributed to seven schools in Hamilton County.

What began as a sidewalks infrastructure project along routes to schools in Coeur d’Alene blossomed into something bigger.

Delaware's Safe Routes to School Program began in May 2004 after a SRTS Program was formally established through a bill that included starting pilot programs in schools throughout the state.

The kindergarten through sixth grade students at Shelley Elementary School in American Fork, UT, have no bus system to take them to and from school.

The Safe Routes to School (SRTS) committee in the City of New London, IA, is in the beginning phases of implementing its SRTS activities within the community.

Two Lawton, Oklahoma, schools have begun walking school buses to address different challenges, and both schools have seen unexpected benefits from their efforts.

Washington’s Safe Routes to School (W-SRTS) program began in 2004, when the Washington State legislature funded a Safe Routes to School pilot project.

Working together, the Village of Machesney Park, IL, and the Harlem School District received funding for a twofold approach to make the routes to school safer for children.

The Forest Park Elementary School PTA utilized strengths of its parent volunteers.