Safe Routes Successes - Funding and Policy

What began as a sidewalks infrastructure project along routes to schools in Coeur d’Alene blossomed into something bigger.

In March 2006, Safe Routes Chattanooga was awarded $364,000 in Safe Routes to School federal funds through the Tennessee Department of Transportation to be distributed to seven schools in Hamilton County.

The Forest Park Elementary School PTA utilized strengths of its parent volunteers.

Roosevelt Middle School and the surrounding community of Eugene, Oregon, have successfully developed a team of community organizations committed to providing Safe Routes to School (SRTS) for children.

Washington’s Safe Routes to School (W-SRTS) program began in 2004, when the Washington State legislature funded a Safe Routes to School pilot project.

Thomas Elementary School was one of three schools that benefited from the $39,000 federal SRTS noninfrastructure award.

Neighborhoods and schools in Taylor will be connected with a 2.4-mile pedestrian and bike path to make the way to school safer for elementary, middle and high school students.

Jericho Elementary School, a kindergarten through fourth grade school faced two obstacles in creating a Safe Routes to School program: few students living within walking distance, and a highway next to the school.

The Safe Routes to School (SRTS) committee in the City of New London, IA, is in the beginning phases of implementing its SRTS activities within the community.